myjetpack:

I drew the cover for this week’s New Yorker.

myjetpack:

I drew the cover for this week’s New Yorker.

(via fatfunnyfloralfeminist)

I made this shitty doodle and it’s got 40k notes. There’s a lot of alcoholics  out there. Drink Campari, you fools. :)

I made this shitty doodle and it’s got 40k notes. There’s a lot of alcoholics out there. Drink Campari, you fools. :)

(Source: theannachrist)

I made a love note to my boyfriend and it’s got 8k notes. There’s a lot of good cat people out there that identify with this. :) cat people are my favorite people.

I made a love note to my boyfriend and it’s got 8k notes. There’s a lot of good cat people out there that identify with this. :) cat people are my favorite people.

(Source: theannachrist, via radical-rebellion)

Anonymous said: Do you have any flower doodles?

You want my homegirl flower doodle extraordinaire: Tea Leigh. Tealeigh on tumblr or @tealeigh on IG.

"Traveling is like flirting with life. It’s like saying, ‘I would stay and love you, but I have to go."

Lisa St Aubin de Terán (via travelingilove)

(via petitcafeaupreau)

I don’t usually do nonfiction, but I just finished a dense book about archaeology and ancient civilizations and so as not to dive head first into Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow (I’ve never been a jumper, I’m always the vocal easer-inner climbing down the stairs at the shallow end) I picked out a few select essays from DFW’s collection “Consider the Lobster” to cleanse the palate. A suitable transition from dense nonfiction to absurdist fiction.

It’s been almost a year since I’ve read any DFW (as it was a year ago I exhausted all of his fiction) and in a short year’s time I had forgotten what a god DFW is. Pure genius, he was given the gift of acuity, articulation and relatability. His essays are brilliant. The title essay “Consider the Lobster” was a paid assignment with Gourmet magazine. They thought they were sending a best-selling author to a lobster festival for an interesting, non-recipe article and it devolves into a cynical persuasive argument for vegetarianism. And the essay “How Tracy Austen Broke my Heart” is like all of his essays: ridiculous, circumambulatory, conversational— and then clenches with a piercing thesis that is the last paragraph— hell, maybe only the last sentence. You come up sputtering, grinning, it rings so crystal- clear, you wonder how it’s possible.

DFW should have written the bible. He’s good at “dense”, he’s got a strong moral compass, an understanding of human nature and a talent for relaying wisdom.

But alas, my god is dead.

And he had one message anyways: empathy. And he delivered it so eloquently in the only speech he ever made: This is water. That is my bible.

bijoukarman:

Jane

bijoukarman:

Jane

(Source: somethingtoseeorhear)

(Source: globe-lamp-glow)

Anonymous said: would u mind if i got one of ur doodles tatted theyre really cool and i was planning on doing it stick and poke too :-)

Sure! So long as you’re not a dick about it and credit my design in photos and such! Spread the word on the #shittydoodlesforever club! Poke on, comrade

likeafieldmouse:

Thilo Heinzmann - Nude (2012)

likeafieldmouse:

Thilo Heinzmann - Nude (2012)

(via lemieletlalune)

"She is not perfect. You are not perfect. The question is whether or not you are perfect for each other."

Robin Williams in Good Will Hunting (1997)

(Source: larmoyante, via wardsnow)

(Source: bighardssun, via denofopulence)

Rise and Shine - NYTimes.com

Breakfast is the highlight of my day, everyday. I always fall asleep hungry (no eating past a certain hour) and I wake up ravenous. I eat the same damn thing every morning: oatmeal with a cup of blueberries on top and a cup of Greek yogurt on top of that. It makes for this hot and cold parfait style breakfast, I swear it’s almost like hot blueberry pie with ice cream except there’s no sugar beyond what’s in the blueberries. Been eating it for years and years. Recently traveling in Turkey I had to adjust my palate to the traditional turkish breakfast: olives, feta, bread, hard boiled egg. I loved seeing what the rest of this world eats in this adorable article.

Ebola

Ebola scares the shit out of me. When I learned about it in the tenth grade, I immediately recognized it as the single scariest pathogen. It’s perfect. Contagious, deadly. If released, it would be the most helpless, terrifying end man could meet.

As a scientist, it give me chills. Imagine all of your insides liquify, your blood vessels give out, your cells are lysing, exploding with the burden of millions of new virus. Everything inside of you is pooling, your blood pressure drops. It comes out of every orifice, vomit, diarrhea and don’t forget pores. Every orifice is leaking live virus, necessitating isolation from the onset. Your loved ones cannot be there.

The survival rate is currently 50%.

Did you know that forest fires are a crucial part of ecology? They fertilize the soil, renew nitrogen and carbon, some tree seeds even require the fire for germination. Death is a part of life. Extinction is a part of evolution.

The bubonic plague in the 1400’s killed 25 million, roughly a third of Europe’s population. Epidemics are a part of evolution.

Don’t misunderstand me, I am as scared of Ebola as the rest. Especially as I’m currently reading the Walking Dead comics. But do you know how good it would be for the organism that is this planet if half of the population disappeared? We are so overpopulated, overburdening our environment, unsustainably reproducing and eating and creating waste.

The planet knows how to take care of itself. Imagine we are a cancer and epidemics are the immune system of the planet.

Imagine you are not a snowflake, you are a cog. Merely a cell of a bigger organism and you are not only reproducing uncontrolled, but malignant. You are killing this planet. When that happens inside of our own body, your immune system sends out cells that kill what is hurting it. Unfortunately, we now know that our immune systems are imperfect and it’s more a war of attrition than sniper fire. Our immune systems indiscriminately harm good cells and bad cells a lot of times.

That is Ebola. An immune response that cannot differentiate. But it’s here to stop us.